Advancing to North Central Regional JSHS

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Advancing to State: What to Expect
General FAQs
Judging FAQs

Advancing to State: What to Expect

STUDENTS: WHAT TO EXPECT

  • Expect to meet lots of bright students from across the state who have also conducted scientific and engineering research projects.
  • Expect to meet other students and learn about their projects, interests, and aspirations.
  • Expect to talk with professionals in science and engineering fields that you might be interested in learning more about.
  • Expect to participate in a lot of activities! See the Tentative Schedule for an idea of what will be happening.

INFORMATION FOR PARENTS

Parents – we want you to volunteer! We have many areas that require extra hands for the competitions to run smoothly. Although we don’t allow parents to volunteer in areas with potential conflicts of interest, we need your help in other areas that don’t have an impact on judging outcomes. Please visit the General Volunteers section of our website or use contact@mnmas.org for more information about volunteering.

Because we know parents can’t always be there for the full weekend, we broke down the registration fee into individual portions so you can attend just the parts that you are able and want to attend. For details on the “a la carte” fees, please view the Registration Fees page or watch the Video Registration Guide.

WHAT TO BRING

  • Dress clothes (see below)
  • Your scientific research PowerPoint presentation ON A FLASH DRIVE (laptops will be provided)
  • Casual clothes and comfy shoes for activities
  • Swim suit for the pool
  • Toothbrush and pajamas!
  • Camera to take pictures or a smartphone to post them on the Twitter feed
  • Extra money for meals that aren’t covered as part of registration. 

DRESS CODE

Students should dress professionally for judging day and for the awards ceremony. For guys, this means a suit and tie or dress pants, a shirt and tie. For gals, it means dress pants and a blazer, a skirt and a professional top, or a professional dress.

General FAQs

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER I CHECK IN?

After you check-in, you will load your flash-drive into the laptop of the room you are presenting in (you'll find this out when you check in) and test to make sure everything is displaying properly. 

WHEN IS FOOD PROVIDED?

Meals provided as part of your full registration fee (or you may pay a la carte to enjoy the meals):

  • Sunday Morning Breakfast 
  • Saturday Lunch with the Scientists & Keynote Presentation 

 

WHAT IS GOING ON WHEN I’M NOT PRESENTING MY PAPER?

See the Tentative Schedule for a full listing of activities and times.

Saturday 9:30am-12:00pm & 1:30pm - 4:00pm Paper Presentation competition. Callback round competition 6:30-10:30pm.

Free admission to listen to papers only.:

  • Listen to presentations and learn from your peers
  • Families can listen to paper presentations for free but may not ask any questions

Judging FAQs

HOW DOES THE JUDGING PROCESS WORK?

Students and judges are assigned to rooms based on the category of their presentation. Students give a 12-minute powerpoint presentation which is followed by 6 minutes of questions from the judges. Judges fill out comment and scoresheets for each student (or team, if students do a team project).

WHO ARE THE JUDGES?

All of the judges are volunteers from the local scientific community. Many of the judges work at local science and engineering companies (e.g. Seagate, 3M, Medtronic, etc…) or do research at local colleges and universities. 

WHAT SORTS OF QUESTIONS DO THE JUDGES ASK?

Each judge will approach a project with a certain background and knowledge about the topic that the student studied, so questions will be based on what the judge is interested in about your project. The questions listed below are examples of what students might be asked.

  • Where did you get the idea for your research?
  • Do your results indicate further study is needed?
  • How is your project different from past studies?
  • What are possible sources of error or bias in your study?
  • What are the limitations of your project?
  • How did you control the variables?
  • What instruments did you use to take your measurements?
  • What did you base your conclusions on?
  • How much time did you spend on your study?
  • Who helped with your project?
  • What would you do differently if you did your project again?